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Harm Reduction and Research Grants of Over $1 Million Awarded by Rize

Posted by Paula Schmitt on

Harm reduction is an important part of every sobriety platform. Self-harm is what we call any action or situation that is caused by the addict and that can hurt them physically, mentally, or emotionally.

As part of their continuing battle against the opioid crisis in the state, Rize Massachusetts has awarded more than $1 million in grants for harm reduction services in addition to research projects that will have a long-term impact on the opioid crisis both in the state and across the country. 

Harm Reduction Services

Harm reduction is the process which focuses on reducing negative consequences of drug use and encouraging addicts to embrace all positive changes in their lives and health. It's an approach that aims to help addicts stay healthy while the Rize community attempts to bring them around to treatment. These harm reduction services include overdose education, syringe services, and naloxone distribution to prevent overdose. 

Research Grants

In addition to harm reduction services, Rize has also made substantial grant donations to research institutes, as well.

Brandeis University was awarded funds to continue their research into how the system itself inadvertently contributes to the opioid crisis. 

Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) is working with the Institute for Community Health and Boston Medical Center (BMC) to understand how to better serve those opioid addicts who are looking for help after an overdose incident. 

Finally, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine is examining how to better meet the oral health needs of addicts. 

Eighto2 Shop Helps Fund Harm Reduction and Research

Eighto2 Shop is proud that Rize Massachusetts is one of the charities supported by our sales. With all the incredible work they do to help people climb out of addiction, we're happy to be able to contribute to their cause. Please, shop with us, and help us fight against the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts. 

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